A Favorite Quote From Buffett

Here’s a quote highlighted by Warren Buffett during this weekend’s annual meeting in response to a question about derivatives and financial reform. It was written by economist John Maynard Keynes in his influential economic textbook “The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money.” Back in 1936, mind you. Emphasis mine.

In one of the greatest investment markets in the world, namely, New York, the influence of speculation…is enormous. Even outside the field of finance, Americans are apt to be unduly interested in discovering what average opinion believes average opinion to be; and this national weakness finds its nemesis in the stock market. It is rare, one is told, for an American to invest, as many Englishmen still do, “for income”; and he will not readily purchase an investment except in the hope of capital appreciation. This is only another way of saying that, when he purchases an investment, the American is attaching his hopes, not so much to its prospective yield, as to a favourable change in the conventional basis of valuation, i.e. that he is, in the above sense, a speculator.

Speculators may do no harm as bubbles on a steady stream of enterprise. But the position is serious when enterprise becomes the bubble on a whirlpool of speculation. When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. The measure of success attained by Wall Street, regarded as an institution of which the proper social purpose is to direct new investment into the most profitable channels in terms of future yield, cannot be claimed as one of the outstanding triumphs of laissez-faire capitalism — which is not surprising, if I am right in thinking that the best brains of Wall Street have been in fact directed towards a different object.

Cale Smith

About Cale Smith

Portfolio Manager at Islamorada Investment Management.
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